Entitlement

A strong sense of entitlement is a major symptom of narcissism. The narcissist insists that he/she is entitled to have whatever they want when they want it, without regard to what is fair or reasonable to others. Belief in such entitlement makes them arrogant, demanding, inconsiderate and selfish. He (or she) is never grateful because he believes that everything he receives is his due.

So he takes everything and everyone for granted. He expects to receive favours without every having to do anyone else a favour. He feels entitled to invade and trespass on others’ boundaries. He makes unrealistic demands and expects others to inconvenience themselves and to tie themselves in knots for his benefit.

If he doesn’t get what he wants he might well rant and rave, lash out, smash something, or threaten violence, not necessarily because he has problems with anger management, but because he wants to (and believes he is entitled to) act any way he chooses when he is upset.

He has no concern or respect for the rights of others but vigorously protects his own. Rules, guidelines, convention and laws apply to other people and he alone is entitled to disregard them.

Being special and superior entitles him to special treatment (like a celebrity guest in a five star hotel) simply because of who he is, not because he necessarily does anything to deserve favourable consideration. Like some regal potentate he assumes others will, and should, fulfil all his needs, joyously, and make any sacrifice for him without question or qualm. I once watched a well know TV personality throw a tantrum at a doctor’s surgery when the receptionist refused to let him jump the queue and see the doctor ahead of the patients who had bothered to make an appointment.

 Someone so superior is entitled to get his way, to have whatever he wants without concern for how that affects anyone else. He feels entitled to receive without giving in return. He will flirt with other women, ignore his partner, treat her with disdain and yet still expect love and devotion. He is allowed to make demands and expect things and be disappointed and angry if he does not get them, but other people are not.

He lives a double standard that says, “You must do as I want but how dare you expect anything of me?” He expects to be loved for no good reason, unconditionally, without having to do a thing to deserve it. He feels entitled to rights and privileges that ordinary people do not have. Being so special and superior gives him the right to invade other’s space and privacy, make use of their possessions, “borrow” money without repaying it, keep them waiting, interrupt, criticize, insult, dominate, bully or ignore them.

 He never appreciates anything people do for him because he genuinely believes that people enjoy f